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Keeping things simple means letting go. It means giving up some control to the people who are going to use what you’re building. Build the basics and as people use it, you’ll discover two things. First, you’ll find out where the value is. Second, you’ll find out what’s missing. Then you iterate. Biz Stone .

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Over the last five or so years, I have seen rapid changes brought on by the incredibly fast moving mobile technology. We’re currently finding that no-one really understands how to design for the myriad devices that are existing, and no-one really has a grip as to where this is going. Typographic design will definitely have a role to play in providing good reading experiences. However, it is important to understand that these reading experience are probably going to be quite different from what we already know. Typeface design will be part of this evolution, not only for the Latin script, but on a global basis. Dalton Maag .

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Inspiration is having your eyes and ears wide open. It comes from everywhere. It can be a conversation you have in the pub with a complete stranger, it can be a shape you see as you walk along the road. I often doodle whilst on the telephone, or whilst I draw up my shopping list. I like letting my mind wander and doodling allows me to let the pencil find its own way on the paper. Dalton Maag .

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I see a future where every business, organization, institution, retail establishment, in fact EVERYTHING has it’s own bespoke font that operate in spectacular idiosyncratic ways based on the spirit of the organization. Paula Scher .

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When I see a designer who is quick to give an opinion on another’s work without attempting to retrace the thought process behind it, I see a designer who is very tied to the opinions of others in their own work.

But no one is paying designers for the opinions of their peers. Clients trust a designer who will listen to them about their problem and then think for themselves on how to solve it. It is why the Verizon redesign, like a host of other much-derided Pentagram identities, will ultimately be a success. Does that make me personally like it? It certainly does not. But what I like and what I think is best are not one in the same. They can be mutually exclusive. I do not think I have earned the right to think of my opinion in such a high-minded manner.

Andrew Beck .

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Inspiration does not equal education. And by that I do not mean formal education, but educated decision making. Being able to identify the real-world challenges of your client and all the accompanying factors is the first step in a successful –not a pretty– design execution. This vision should be the primary focus of a designer, because it is very much a part of the design process, especially with branding projects.

To create a singular graphic that meets the criteria of all communication mediums, the technical considerations of current assets while planning for future assets, and striking an emotional chord in human beings for the purpose of spurring them to action, is the glorious pinnacle of graphic design.

Andrew Beck .

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Design is critical thinking made tangible in order to meet a predetermined goal.

If you truly believe that, then ask yourself what the purpose behind the endless sea of logos, icons, and layouts created on –let’s take Dribble– truly is? If your answer is «just inspiration» then you have answered correctly. There is no client. There is no goal other than displaying production skills and pandering to the rest of the community for affirmation. It is a vacuum. But design does not exist in a vacuum. There is always a goal that transcends the visual layer you judge at first glance.

Andrew Beck .

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The effect that education and «inspiration» have had upon the design world is a two-edged sword. Designers have become more informed about what the rest of the community is doing, but less aware of why they are doing it. We are quick to form opinions that match the herd's, and do little to impact the zeitgeist by straying too far into the Land of Vanilla for fear of the herd’s criticisms or neglect. This is not healthy for design or designers. Andrew Beck .

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Not all uses of time are equal and this simple truth can make a big difference in life.

People who spend their time doing more profitable work make more money. People who spend their time investing in others build better relationships. People who spend their time creating a flexible career enjoy more freedom. People who spend their time working on high-impact projects contribute more to society. Whether you want more wealth, more friendship, more freedom, or more impact, it all comes down to how you spend your time.

James Clear .