Comment

There are so many young and talented type designers today. I think we are in a kind of type design renaissance. There’s a ton of crap, but there’s also more good stuff than ever before being released. When I got interested in type design back in the 1970s, there were maybe a dozen or two new releases each year that I was aware of, and only a handful of major ones. Seems like we get that every month now. And the quality is often higher. Mark Simonson.

Comment

The biggest challenge designers face is the problem of finding good clients who actually value good design for itself—clients who don't perceive design as just another expense, but a worthwhile investment. Michael C. Place.

Comment

… a great deal of useful and insightful feedback happens when the design process is transparent. not all feedback is useful so it is important to know the difference. Lance Wyman.

Comment

… how every one of my typography prints have evolved. I select a subject, super excited to start, then I find myself wondering why I agreed to work on something that would consume 50 to 300 hours of my time, and then I couldn’t be more pleased with the result when it’s all done. And I don’t know how many times I’ve told myself, «I’ll never do that again.» Cameron Moll.

Comment

Don’t overlook the obvious. designers too often neglect exploring ideas because they seem to obvious, trite, corny, etc. when the obvious is transformed into a new image it can be powerful and easily understood. Lance Wyman.

Comment

There’s something dangerous about the belief that founders and entrepreneurs are somehow better people, with better and more valuable lives simply because they started a company. It’s just not true.

What makes someone’s career valuable is if they created products and completed projects that they are proud of that. That’s it. There’s no fine print that says you aren't worth shit if you don’t startup.

Jon Westenberg.

Comment

We believe in-house designers are sometimes less likely to fight hard for the best solutions. Why rock the boat and compromise a promotion or rapport with management? It’s an understandable response intended for self-preservation (we’ve all been there) — but this allows super hands-on CEOs to get their amateur design mitts all over everything. External design teams can often have an easier time guarding against executive meanderings and over-contributions that can derail projects, compromise the effectiveness of a thoughtful system, and cause significant delays.

External design teams can also provide a fresh perspective and approach to a company’s communication objectives. A discovery process will bring the team up to speed on what needs to be accomplished, but then something extra valuable kicks in: the external team balances their understanding of the problem with their perspective as ‘new users.’ This vantage can be a critical contribution that helps an organization see through the lens of a first time viewer. Internal project leaders and team members are often too intimate with their brand/product to see solutions from an outside perspective.

Studio Function.

Comment

Designers are lucky because their jobs are incredibly stimulating. It’s fun to create beautiful, functional things that people actually enjoy. Non-designers also love being a part of the creative process. It feels good to collaborate and actually make something. The danger is when someone is not qualified or skilled enough, but insists on playing a hands-on role in the design execution. Studio Function.

Comment

Designers sell a process and know how to apply that plan to solve problems and address communication objectives. Design isn’t just sitting in front of an Adobe program and pushing coloured boxes around—it’s about discovering and fully understanding the client’s problem and leading them to a point of actionable clarity. It’s easier to get to a point of clarity (and an approved design) when there is a defined plan right from the beginning of the project. Studio Function.